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Cartoon -- A Leading Experimenter Believes That Our Lower Animals...
Cartoon -- A Leading Ex...
Russom R. G. (1877-1952...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- A Leading Experimenter Believes That Our Lower Animals...
Creator
Russom R. G. (1877-1952)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This issue has a theme of Summer joys., While definitive information has not been found, an Australian artist living in America named Reginald G. Russom may be the same. It is known that the Australian artist signed paintings R. G. Russom, and was a founding member of the Australian Cartoonists Association. There is some dispute about the year he was born, but he was educated at the Sydney Art School and moved to the United States, where he was active as an illustrator of numerous books and also drew cartoons for various publications including Life. The cartoons he drew for Life were often with themes of futuristic mass transportation. He died in 1952., Full page cartoon. Starting in around 1885, science was able to identify many diseases were caused by poor nutrition. Quite a bit of testing of various nutrients was done both on animal and human populations.]
Advertisement -- Peter's Milk Chocolate.
Advertisement -- Peter'...
Quarter page advertisem...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Peter's Milk Chocolate.
Description
Quarter page advertisement for Peter's "the Original Swiss Milk" Chocolate, imported by Lamont, Corliss & Co., New York.
Cover -- The Siren
Cover -- The Siren
Fischer, Anton Otto. (1...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cover -- The Siren
Creator
Fischer, Anton Otto. (1882-1962)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., Anton Otto Fischer was born in Germany and orphaned at an early age. He came to America as a deckhand and went on to sail on American ships. He began his art career as a model and handyman for another artist, A. B. Frost. In 1906, he went to the Academie Julien in Paris to study. On returning to the United States, he began studying with Howard Pyle. He began illustrating books and magazines in New York after 1910. He is well known for his seascapes and nautical themes, though he drew a large variety of subjects. He died in 1962., Full page color cover.]
Advertisement -- Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary.
Advertisement -- Funk &...
[Full page advertisemen...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary.
Description
[Full page advertisement for Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary., Funk & Wagnalls was an American publisher known for its reference works. Funk & Wagnalls was founded by Isaac Kaufman Funk in 1875 as I.K. Funk & Company. Adam Willis Wagnalls joined the firm as a partner in 1877, and the name was changed to Funk & Wagnalls Company. During its early years, Funk & Wagnalls Company published religious books. The publication of The Literary Digest in 1890 marked a shift to publishing of general reference dictionaries and encyclopedias. The firm published The Standard Dictionary of the English Language in 1894 and Funk & Wagnalls Standard Encyclopedia in 1912. The last printing of Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia was in 1997; the encyclopedia exists today only as an electronic reference, Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia, provided to educational institutions by the World Almanac Education Group.]
Cartoon -- Public Service.
Cartoon -- Public Servi...
Walker, William Henry. ...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Public Service.
Creator
Walker, William Henry. 1871-1938
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., William Henry Walker was born on February 13, 1871, in Pittston, Pennsylvania He entered Kentucky University in 1888, transferring to the University of Rochester where he received a Bachelor of Science in 1891. Walker started drawing cartoons for Life in 1894 and became a full-time staff member four years later. Walker’s style was a combination of serious politics and humor, which fit well into the image Life wanted to promote. He used stereotypical analogies to make his point, and concentrated on the increasing diversity of America and around domestic political policy. He died in 1938., Partial page cartoon. Since the beginning of Rail travel, regular trains carried coffins in their baggage cars. In London, cemeteries in the city were running out of space, so the idea of a Funeral Train, the London Necropolis Railroad, came about. It carried coffins to cemeteries located outside the city. While no information could be found for such a venture in the United States, it is possible that the subject came up.]
Advertisement -- Woodbury's Facial Soap.
Advertisement -- Woodbu...
Approximately 3 x 8 inc...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Woodbury's Facial Soap.
Description
Approximately 3 x 8 inch advertisement for Woodbury's Facial Soap.
Cartoon -- Bird's Eye View of the Political Situation.
Cartoon -- Bird's Eye V...
Dart, Harry Grant, (186...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Bird's Eye View of the Political Situation.
Creator
Dart, Harry Grant, (1869 – 1938)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This issue is the "Pacific Coast Number.", Harry Grant Dart was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1869. His worked for a time creating crayon portraits for the National Crayon Company brochures. He drew for the Boston Herald and the New York World. The World sent Dart to Cuba as a sketch artist for important events. Eventually, he became the art editor of the World. Around the same time, he started his cartoon strip, the Explorigator. The strip only ran for 14 weeks in 1908. Dart went on to become a very prolific cartoonist for Life and Judge during the 1920s. He is best known for his futuristic and aviation-oriented cartoons and comic strips. His detailed cartoons featured complicated perspectives and futuristic speculations. He died in New Hampshire in 1938., Two page spread.]
Advertisement -- Ford Motor Company: "Experience."
Advertisement -- Ford M...
[One quarter page adver...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Ford Motor Company: "Experience."
Description
[One quarter page advertisement for the Ford Motor Company, Detroit, Michigan., Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automaker based in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. The automaker was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. Ford introduced methods for large-scale manufacturing of cars and large-scale management of an industrial workforce using elaborately engineered manufacturing sequences typified by moving assembly lines. Henry Ford's methods came to be known around the world as Fordism by 1914. The company is still controlled by the Ford family, which owns a controlling stake in Ford Motor.]
Cartoon -- The Wild East.
Cartoon -- The Wild Eas...
Wildhack Robert. (1881-...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Wild East.
Creator
Wildhack Robert. (1881-1940)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This was the Wild East Number., Robert J. Wildhack was born on August 27, 1881, in Pekin, Illinois and attended high school in Indianapolis, where he studied under Otto Stark. He graduated from the Manual Training High School in 1899. Wildhack worked as an illustrator for the Indianapolis Sentinel before moving to New York City in 1901. There he studied under Robert Henri at the Chase School of Art , a school attended by quite a number of up and coming artists. Wildhack began his art career in New York with a sign painting firm, then went on to work as a designer with an advertising agency. His work was noticed by the editor of McClure's. Wildhack became one of the top cover artists and poster artists in America for publications such as The Century, Collier's, Life, The Reader, Scribner's, and Success. Shortly before America's entry into World War I, Wildhack joined Charles Dana Gibson, and others in the establishment of the Division of Pictorial Publicity of the Committee on Public Information. He died on June 19, 1940, in Montrose, California., Two page spread in follow up to the Wild West issue the preceding week.]
Cartoon -- The Wild East.
Cartoon -- The Wild Eas...
Wildhack Robert. (1881-...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Wild East.
Creator
Wildhack Robert. (1881-1940)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This was the Wild East Number., Robert J. Wildhack was born on August 27, 1881, in Pekin, Illinois and attended high school in Indianapolis, where he studied under Otto Stark. He graduated from the Manual Training High School in 1899. Wildhack worked as an illustrator for the Indianapolis Sentinel before moving to New York City in 1901. There he studied under Robert Henri at the Chase School of Art , a school attended by quite a number of up and coming artists. Wildhack began his art career in New York with a sign painting firm, then went on to work as a designer with an advertising agency. His work was noticed by the editor of McClure's. Wildhack became one of the top cover artists and poster artists in America for publications such as The Century, Collier's, Life, The Reader, Scribner's, and Success. Shortly before America's entry into World War I, Wildhack joined Charles Dana Gibson, and others in the establishment of the Division of Pictorial Publicity of the Committee on Public Information. He died on June 19, 1940, in Montrose, California., Two page spread in follow up to the Wild West issue the preceding week.]
Cartoon -- The Compleat Hypochondriac.
Cartoon -- The Compleat...
Lowell, Orson Bryan. (1...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Compleat Hypochondriac.
Creator
Lowell, Orson Bryan. (1871-1956)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. The theme of this was the "Coward's number.", Orson Bryan Lowell, born in 1871, was the son of landscape painter Milton Lowell. His artist father encouraged him to "draw something every day". He trained at the Art Institute of Chicago. Life Magazine hired him as a contributor in 1907. He also contributed pen and ink cartoons and color covers to American Girl, American Boy, Judge, Puck, and other magazines. He was in demand as a book illustrator and did some poster art as well. His humorous cartoons captured the social climate of the day. He had a long association with Life Magazine. He died in 1956., Full page cartoon. John Ames Mitchell, the editor of Life magazine, was known to be very against the use of vaccines, medicines, and serums for the treatment of disease. He believed in sanitation. In part, this was because he was opposed to any testing on animals by the pharmaceutical companies. The hypochondriac in the cartoon may bear a small resemblance to Mitchell.]
Cover -- Northern Lights.
Cover -- Northern Light...
Miller, C. F.
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cover -- Northern Lights.
Creator
Miller, C. F.
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. While there was not an official theme for this issue, the cover depicted a horseman wearing a Mexican style hat looking towards the Northern lights depicted as an American flag., The the signature C. F. Miller is clear on this cover illustration, no other definitive information on Miller could be found., Full page color cover. Mexico was involved in a Revolution from around 1910 through 1920. The conflicts strayed over the border to the US in 1916 with Pancho Villa's raid of Columbus, New Mexico. This was followed by followed by Pershing's expedition into Northern Mexico with 12,000 troops. The U. S. National Guard was sent to guard the Mexican border.]
Advertisement  -- Colt Automatic Pistol.
Advertisement -- Colt A...
[Half page advertisemen...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Colt Automatic Pistol.
Description
[Half page advertisement for the Colt Automatic Pistol, placed by Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company., Colt's Manufacturing Company (formerly Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company) is a United States firearms manufacturer, founded in 1836 by Samuel Colt. Colt is best known for the engineering, production, and marketing of firearms over the later half of the 19th and the 20th century. Colt's earliest designs played a major role in the popularization of the revolver and the shift away from earlier single-shot pistols. While Samuel Colt did not invent the revolver concept, his designs resulted in the first very successful ones. In 2002, Colt Defense, which serves the law enforcement, military, and private security markets worldwide, split off from Colt Manufacturing Company, which now serves the civilian market only.]
Cartoon -- Mrs. Sharp-Fang: Curly, I will not allow any more pets about the place...
Cartoon -- Mrs. Sharp-F...
Sullivant, T. S. (1854-...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Mrs. Sharp-Fang: Curly, I will not allow any more pets about the place...
Creator
Sullivant, T. S. (1854-1926)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., Thomas Sterling Sullivant was born in Columbus, Ohio. He may have studied art in Germany, where he lived for several years. He returned to the United States in 1885 and moved to Philadelphia where he studied at the Philadelphia Academy of Art with Thomas Eakins. In 1886, he sold his first cartoon. He soon was appearing in a number of periodicals, including Life. He continued to study with various artists, such as Edward Moran and E. D. Bensell. He utilized a pen and ink style that was meticulously cross-hatched, which was popular at the time. His cartoons were masterfully distorted figures of animals and stereotypical people referred to as “grotesque yet believable.” He also worked for a number of other periodicals and for William Randolph Hearst, but returned to Life in 1911 and contributed cartoons until his death in 1926. He is considered to be one of the most influential cartoonists of his time., Slightly larger than half page cartoon, part of Sullivant's caveman series.]
Cartoon -- You May Believe it or Not.
Cartoon -- You May Beli...
Dart, Harry Grant, (186...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- You May Believe it or Not.
Creator
Dart, Harry Grant, (1869 – 1938)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. The theme of this issue was Philadelphia., Harry Grant Dart was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1869. His worked for a time creating crayon portraits for the National Crayon Company brochures. He drew for the Boston Herald and the New York World. The World sent Dart to Cuba as a sketch artist for important events. Eventually, he became the art editor of the World. Around the same time, he started his cartoon strip, the Explorigator. The strip only ran for 14 weeks in 1908. Dart went on to become a very prolific cartoonist for Life and Judge during the 1920s. He is best known for his futuristic and aviation-oriented cartoons and comic strips. His detailed cartoons featured complicated perspectives and futuristic speculations. He died in New Hampshire in 1938., Dart drew this image of Philadelphia with the title "You may Believe it or Not" 17 years before Robert Ripley drew his first cartoon entitled "Believe it or Not"., Two page spread cartoon.]
Cartoon -- How the Cap'n lost his leg.
Cartoon -- How the Cap'...
Cady, Walter Harrison (...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cartoon -- How the Cap'n lost his leg.
Creator
Cady, Walter Harrison (1877–1970)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. While no official titled them for this issue, the cover illustration is of Santa checking the Bad Boys list., Walter Harrison Cady was born in Gardner, Massachusetts, in 1877. His family ran a general store, but encouraged him in his art skills. Cady apprenticed with local painter, Parker Perkins. His first publication was an illustration in a supplement Harper's Young People. After the death of his farther, he moved to New York and found a job as an illustrator at the Brooklyn Eagle, supporting his mother. He also freelanced for other publications. He was signed on as staff to Life in the position of artist and cartoonist. He enjoyed a long career as an illustrator of books, magazines, and newspapers. His career lasted over 70 years. His longest running comic strip was Peter Rabbit, which he wrote and drew for 28 years. He died in 1970., About two thirds of a page cartoon.]
Cartoon -- The Latest Craze.
Cartoon -- The Latest C...
Gibson, Charles Dana. (...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Latest Craze.
Creator
Gibson, Charles Dana. (1867-1944)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., Charles Dana Gibson was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts to a politically active family in 1867. Recognizing his early talent, his parents enrolled him in New York's Art Students League. After two years of study, he sold his first pen and ink sketch to John Ames Mitchell at Life. He also sold work to other major magazines and was called on to illustrate books as well. He married in 1895. His elegant new bride and her sister served as the inspiration for the ever popular Gibson Girls. He was the president of Society of Illustrators in the teens. During WWI he headed a government agency that produced war posters. After the war, he became the editor and owner of Life. On his retirement, he began painting in oil. He died in 1944., Two page spread cartoon. Indoor and outdoor ice skating became quite a fad in 1916. Society women ordered skating costumes from their dressmakers and large hotels created indoor rinks by flooding their ballrooms.]
Advertisement -- Pears' Soap: "Good Looks."
Advertisement -- Pears'...
[One third page adverti...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Pears' Soap: "Good Looks."
Description
[One third page advertisement for Pears' Soap., Pears’ transparent soap (actually translucent) was first produced and sold in 1789 by Andrew Pears at a factory just off Oxford Street in London, England. It was the world's first clear soap. Pears’ Soap is now made by Unilever, and according to company records, Pears’ was the world's first registered brand and is therefore the world's oldest continuously existing brand. In the late 19th century, Pears soap became famous for its marketing, masterminded by Thomas J. Barratt. A campaign using John Everett Millais's painting “Bubbles” continued over many decades. As with many other brands at the time, at the beginning of the 20th century Pears also used their product as a sign of the prevailing European concept of the "civilizing mission" of empire and trade, in which the soap stands for progress. Seen in many Pears’ ads, Lillie Langtry's famous ivory complexion brought her income as the first woman to endorse a commercial product.]
Advertisement -- Oldsmobile
Advertisement -- Oldsmo...
Penfield, Edward (1866-...
[One quarter page adver...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Oldsmobile
Creator
Penfield, Edward (1866-1925)
Description
[One quarter page advertisement for Olds Motor Works, Detroit, USA., Oldsmobile was a brand of American automobile produced for most of its existence by General Motors. It was founded by Ransom E. Olds in 1897. In its 107-year history, it produced 35.2 million cars, including at least 14 million built at its Lansing, Michigan factory. When it was phased out in 2004, Oldsmobile was the oldest surviving American automobile marque, and one of the oldest in the world, after Daimler , Peugeot and Tatra. The closing of the Oldsmobile division presaged a larger consolidation of GM brands and discontinuation of models during the company's 2009 bankruptcy reorganization., Edward Penfield was a leading American illustrator in the era known as the "Golden Age of American Illustration" and he is considered the father of the American Poster. He is also a major figure in the evolution of graphic design. He was born June 2, 1866 in Brooklyn, New York to Ellen Lock Moore and Josiah B. Penfield. He first studied at New York's Art Student's League. He worked under George de Forest Brush, who was known for his romantic scenes of American Indian life. He first worked for Harper's Weekly and later became art director. He developed his own unique style of simplified figures with bold outlines in settings free of extraneous detail. He wrote and published a book titled Holland Sketches, which was published by Scribner's in 1907. Penfield lived in New Rochelle, New York, a popular art colony among actors, writers and artists of the period. The community was most well-known for its unprecedented number of prominent American illustrators. He was one of the founding members of the New Rochelle Art Association which was organized in 1912.]
Cartoon -- "For goodness sake, Albert, don't begin complaining about hard times..."
Cartoon -- "For goodnes...
Gibson, Charles Dana. (...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- "For goodness sake, Albert, don't begin complaining about hard times..."
Creator
Gibson, Charles Dana. (1867-1944)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., Charles Dana Gibson was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts to a politically active family in 1867. Recognizing his early talent, his parents enrolled him in New York's Art Students League. After two years of study, he sold his first pen and ink sketch to John Ames Mitchell at Life. He also sold work to other major magazines and was called on to illustrate books as well. He married in 1895. His elegant new bride and her sister served as the inspiration for the ever popular Gibson Girls. He was the president of Society of Illustrators in the teens. During WWI he headed a government agency that produced war posters. After the war, he became the editor and owner of Life. On his retirement, he began painting in oil. He died in 1944., Full page cartoon. The Gibson Girl was confident, independent, and beautiful. She had ample suitors and she could be picky. She did not suffer fools gladly.]
Advertisement -- Kelly-Springfield Automobile Tires.
Advertisement -- Kelly-...
[Small advertisement, a...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Kelly-Springfield Automobile Tires.
Description
[Small advertisement, approximately 3 x 4 inches, for Kelly-Springfield tires., The Kelly-Springfield Tire Company was founded in Springfield, Ohio by Edwin Kelly and Arthur Grant in 1894. Edwin Kelly originally called the company the Rubber Tire Wheel Company because it made rubber carriage wheels. Arthur Grant was issued a patent for his solid rubber tire in a rim channel, which was an instant success. The company was sold to the McMillin group in 1899 for $2. The company was renamed Consolidated Rubber Tire Company and continued under that name until 1914. The name Kelly-Springfield Tire Company was given to the New York sales subsidiary in 1911. Consolidated's name was changed to Kelly-Springfield Tire Company in 1914. In the 1990s, Kelly-Springfield was absorbed by parent company Goodyear.]
Advertisement -- Wrigley's Spearmint Pepsin Gum.
Advertisement -- Wrigle...
Full page advertisement...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Wrigley's Spearmint Pepsin Gum.
Description
Full page advertisement for Wrigley's Spearmint Pepsin Gum.
Cartoon -- Barred Out:: When Woman has Her Vote.
Cartoon -- Barred Out::...
Cady, Walter Harrison (...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Barred Out:: When Woman has Her Vote.
Creator
Cady, Walter Harrison (1877–1970)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This issue was titled the "Pro-Suffrage Number.", Walter Harrison Cady was born in Gardner, Massachusetts, in 1877. His family ran a general store, but encouraged him in his art skills. Cady apprenticed with local painter, Parker Perkins. His first publication was an illustration in a supplement Harper's Young People. After the death of his farther, he moved to New York and found a job as an illustrator at the Brooklyn Eagle, supporting his mother. He also freelanced for other publications. He was signed on as staff to Life in the position of artist and cartoonist. He enjoyed a long career as an illustrator of books, magazines, and newspapers. His career lasted over 70 years. His longest running comic strip was Peter Rabbit, which he wrote and drew for 28 years. He died in 1970., Full page cartoon. Life ran its share of anti-suffrage cartoons, but this issue was pro-suffrage, not a popular viewpoint to take. Pro-suffrage at that time did not always extend generously to all. This was still a very racist and classist society.]
Advertisement -- Lea and Perrins' Sauce: the Original Worcestershire.
Advertisement -- Lea an...
A slightly less than ha...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Lea and Perrins' Sauce: the Original Worcestershire.
Description
A slightly less than half page advertisement for Lea and Perrins' Original Worcestershire Sauce, which was first sold in 1838 by John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, dispensing chemists from Broad Street, Worcester. Lea & Perrins is a United Kingdom based food division of the H.J. Heinz Company, originating in Worcester, England. A subsidiary in the United States manufactures Lea & Perrins in New Jersey.
Cartoon -- The Doge of Venice.
Cartoon -- The Doge of ...
Cushing, Otho, (1869-19...
[Most Life issues had a...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Doge of Venice.
Creator
Cushing, Otho, (1869-1938)
Description
[Most Life issues had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout. This one was titled "Man"., Otho Cushing was born in 1871 in Fort McHenry, Maryland and attended the Boston School of Arts and the Academie Julian in Paris. He became a professor of drawing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Later, he returned to Paris to accept the position of art editor for the European edition of the Herald-Tribune. In 1906, he submitted his first cartoons to Life and they were accepted. His cartoons were satirical and political, and his style was distinctively classical. He used Greek Gods and Goddesses or classical literature to create personas for modern political characters, often assigning them roles in classic mythology. During World War I, Cushing left Life and served in the Army Air Corps. After the war he lived in New Rochelle, New York, and was a successful water color painter. Cushing died in there in October, 1942., Half page cartoon. This cartoon stars Theodore Roosevelt as Teddiago and William Howard Taft as Taftemona, giving them roles in the intrigue of Shakespeare's play, Othello, which takes place in Venice. Roosevelt and Taft, once supportive political colleagues, became bitter rivals in 1912.]
Advertisement -- Cause and Cure of Thinness
Advertisement -- Cause ...
A 1 1/4 x 2 1/4 inch ad...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Cause and Cure of Thinness
Description
A 1 1/4 x 2 1/4 inch advertisement for a treatise on the Cause and Cure of Thinness, placed by The G. S. Rivard Co., Ltd.
Advertisement -- Schlitz Beer: Beer keeps best in Brown Bottles.
Advertisement -- Schlit...
[Half page advertisemen...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Schlitz Beer: Beer keeps best in Brown Bottles.
Description
[Half page advertisement for Schlitz Beer., The Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company was an American brewery based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and was once the largest producer of beer in the world. Its namesake beer, Schlitz, was known as "The beer that made Milwaukee famous." Schlitz first became the world's top beer producer in 1902 and enjoyed that status at several points during the first half of the twentieth century, exchanging the claim with Anheuser-Busch multiple times during the 1950s. The company was founded by August Krug in 1849 but acquired by Joseph Schlitz in 1858. Schlitz was bought by Stroh Brewery Company in 1982 and subsequently sold along with the rest of Stroh's assets to the Pabst Brewing Company in 1999.]
Advertisement -- Columbia Phonograph Company (Columbia Records)..
Advertisement -- Columb...
[Half page advertisemen...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Columbia Phonograph Company (Columbia Records)..
Description
[Half page advertisement for the Columbia Phonograph Company., The Columbia Phonograph Company was originally a local company run by Edward Easton, distributing and selling Edison phonographs and phonograph cylinders in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Delaware. Its name was derived from from the District of Columbia, which was its headquarters. As was the custom of some regional phonograph companies, Columbia produced many commercial cylinder recordings of its own, and its catalogue of musical records in 1891 was 10 pages. Columbia's ties to Edison and the North American Phonograph Company were severed in 1894 with the North American Phonograph Company's breakup, and thereafter sold only records and phonographs of its own manufacture. During this era, Columbia used the famous "Magic Notes" logo, a pair of sixteenth notes in a circle, both in the United States and overseas. Columbia stopped recording and manufacturing wax cylinder records in 1908, after arranging to issue celluloid cylinder records made by the Indestructible Record Company of Albany, New York, as "Columbia Indestructible Records". In July 1912, Columbia decided to concentrate exclusively on disc records and stopped manufacturing cylinder phonographs although they continued to sell Indestructible's cylinders under the Columbia name for a short while.]
Advertisement -- Moet & Chandon Champagne.
Advertisement -- Moet &...
Quarter page advertisem...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Moet & Chandon Champagne.
Description
Quarter page advertisement for Moet & Chandon "White Seal" Champagne.
Cartoon -- Editor: I think your drawings are very funny...
Cartoon -- Editor: I th...
Sullivant, T. S. (1854-...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Editor: I think your drawings are very funny...
Creator
Sullivant, T. S. (1854-1926)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue., Thomas Sterling Sullivant was born in Columbus, Ohio. He may have studied art in Germany, where he lived for several years. He returned to the United States in 1885 and moved to Philadelphia where he studied at the Philadelphia Academy of Art with Thomas Eakins. In 1886, he sold his first cartoon. He soon was appearing in a number of periodicals, including Life. He continued to study with various artists, such as Edward Moran and E. D. Bensell. He utilized a pen and ink style that was meticulously cross-hatched, which was popular at the time. His cartoons were masterfully distorted figures of animals and stereotypical people referred to as “grotesque yet believable.” He also worked for a number of other periodicals and for William Randolph Hearst, but returned to Life in 1911 and contributed cartoons until his death in 1926. He is considered to be one of the most influential cartoonists of his time., Half page cartoon. No doubt the cartoonist drew on personal experience for this cartoon.]
Cartoon -- "Mother Dear, is that horse with the mask a burglar's horse?"
Cartoon -- "Mother Dear...
Burrows, Hal. (1889 -19...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cartoon -- "Mother Dear, is that horse with the mask a burglar's horse?"
Creator
Burrows, Hal. (1889 -1965)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. While there was not an official theme for this issue, the cover depicted a horseman wearing a Mexican style hat looking towards the Northern lights depicted as an American flag., Harold Burrows was born in Salt Lake City Utah in 1878. He studied at the New York School of Art and the Art Students League with “Hon” Young and Robert Henri, Burrows became a skilled water color artist. His early style, seen here, was in a more Art Nouveau style, but it became more realistic as he matured. He worked as an illustrator, and by the 1920s, he was an art director for Metro Golden Mayer. He died in 1965., Half page cartoon. While the little boy's question is funny, why was the horse wearing a mask? The horse looks like a well maintained race horse and some race horses in training wear a mask with small blinders to keep them focused on the race.]
Cartoon -- "I wish Adam would come home..."
Cartoon -- "I wish Adam...
Fenderson, Mark. (1863-...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- "I wish Adam would come home..."
Creator
Fenderson, Mark. (1863-1944)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This issue's cover was titled “A Fisher of Men.”, Marcus Mitchell "Mark" Fenderson was born in Monticello, Minnesota, in 1863. His father was a retail grocer. After the death of his father, his mother sent him to her brother's school at Billerica, Massachusetts. Noticing Fenderson's artistic talent, his uncle encouraged him to study art, and he studied in France and Italy. His career began in the newspaper as an illustrator of news events. He also contributed to Life for over 10 years and worked at other publications. He also taught school in New York. He died in 1944., Full page cartoon.]
Cartoon -- "'Tis an Ill Wind That Blows Nobody Good."
Cartoon -- "'Tis an Ill...
Cady, Walter Harrison. ...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- "'Tis an Ill Wind That Blows Nobody Good."
Creator
Cady, Walter Harrison. (1877–1970)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This was the "Christmas Number.", Walter Harrison Cady was born in Gardner, Massachusetts, in 1877. His family ran a general store, but encouraged him in his art skills. Cady apprenticed with local painter, Parker Perkins. His first publication was an illustration in a supplement Harper's Young People. After the death of his farther, he moved to New York and found a job as an illustrator at the Brooklyn Eagle, supporting his mother. He also freelanced for other publications. He was signed on as staff to Life in the position of artist and cartoonist. He enjoyed a long career as an illustrator of books, magazines, and newspapers. His career lasted over 70 years. His longest running comic strip was Peter Rabbit, which he wrote and drew for 28 years. He died in 1970., Full page cartoon. The proverb that titles this cartoon is believed to have been first published in 1546 by John Heywood. It meant at the time that there were terrible events that benefited nobody. Later, the same expression meant the opposite: that no matter how bad something is, somewhere, someone will benefit. This cartoon seems to take on the second meaning.]
Advertisement -- Woodbury's facial products.
Advertisement -- Woodbu...
Small advertisement, ap...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Woodbury's facial products.
Description
Small advertisement, approximately 1.75 x 2.5 inches, for Woodbury's products for the face, listing The Andrew Jergens Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, as sole licensee.
Cartoon -- Sports of all Nations: Shooting Butterflies in the Andes.
Cartoon -- Sports of al...
Irvin, Rea. (1881- 1972...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- Sports of all Nations: Shooting Butterflies in the Andes.
Creator
Irvin, Rea. (1881- 1972)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. The theme of this issue was sailing., Rea Irvin was born in San Francisco in 1881, He began his career as an unpaid cartoonist for the San Francisco Examiner. His formal art training was at the Hopkins Art Institute, where he stayed for 6 months. He moved to New York at the age of 25 and became a contributor to several publications, including Life. He rose to the position of art editor at Life. He also worked as a commercial artist. Irvin was fired from Life in 1924, but was soon hired by the New Yorker, where he was responsible for much of the design of the magazine, and was also responsible for the first cover of the magazine as well as the New Yorker typeface. For Life Magazine, he did a number of themed series that appeared over several months, mostly with historical themes. He retired to the Virgin Islands and died there in 1972 at the age of 90., Full page cartoon is from Irvin's Sports of all nations series.]
Advertisement -- Whitman's Chocolates and Confections.
Advertisement -- Whitma...
Small advertisement, ap...
 
Title
Advertisement -- Whitman's Chocolates and Confections.
Description
Small advertisement, approximately 2 x 2.5 inches, for Stephen F. Whitman & Son of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Cartoon -- "Where are we John?"
Cartoon -- "Where are w...
Dart, Harry Grant, (186...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cartoon -- "Where are we John?"
Creator
Dart, Harry Grant, (1869 – 1938)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. This issue is the "Texas Number." Our image of the Life cherub riding a steer comes from the cover of this issue., Harry Grant Dart was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1869. His worked for a time creating crayon portraits for the National Crayon Company brochures. He drew for the Boston Herald and the New York World. The World sent Dart to Cuba as a sketch artist for important events. Eventually, he became the art editor of the World. Around the same time, he started his cartoon strip, the Explorigator. The strip only ran for 14 weeks in 1908. Dart went on to become a very prolific cartoonist for Life and Judge during the 1920s. He is best known for his futuristic and aviation-oriented cartoons and comic strips. His detailed cartoons featured complicated perspectives and futuristic speculations. He died in New Hampshire in 1938., Two page color spread with one of Dart's famous aviation scenes.]
Cover -- The Last Course.
Cover -- The Last Cours...
Irvin, Rea. (1881- 1972...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cover -- The Last Course.
Creator
Irvin, Rea. (1881- 1972)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. While this one did not have a titled theme, the cover is reminiscent of the Arabian Nights or the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam., Rea Irvin was born in San Francisco in 1881, He began his career as an unpaid cartoonist for the San Francisco Examiner. His formal art training was at the Hopkins Art Institute, where he stayed for 6 months. He moved to New York at the age of 25 and became a contributor to several publications, including Life. He rose to the position of art editor at Life. He also worked as a commercial artist. Irvin was fired from Life in 1924, but was soon hired by the New Yorker, where he was responsible for much of the design of the magazine, and was also responsible for the first cover of the magazine as well as the New Yorker typeface. For Life Magazine, he did a number of themed series that appeared over several months, mostly with historical themes. He retired to the Virgin Islands and died there in 1972 at the age of 90., Full color cover. While Irvin was a more prolific cartoonist than cover artist, he later became famous for his covers of the New Yorker.]
Cartoon -- The Longs and the Shorts are very Friendly, but...
Cartoon -- The Longs an...
Perry, Raymond. (1876-1...
[Most issues of Life ha...
 
Title
Cartoon -- The Longs and the Shorts are very Friendly, but...
Creator
Perry, Raymond. (1876-1960)
Description
[Most issues of Life had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. While no official titled them for this issue, the cover illustration is titled "El Dorado.", Raymond Perry was born in Sterling Illinois. He studied art at the Art Institute of Chicago and was a member of the American Water Color Club and the Salmagundi Club. He worked as a painter, illustrator, and designer, and also as a colorist for Superman comics when it was published by National Publications. He died in 1960., Half page cartoon.]
Cover --  Life Inauguration Number.
Cover -- Life Inaugurat...
Walker, William Henry, ...
[Life magazine covers w...
 
Title
Cover -- Life Inauguration Number.
Creator
Walker, William Henry, (1871-1938)
Description
[Life magazine covers were on a variety of topics. Each issue had a theme that was introduced by the cover and reflected throughout the issue. The theme of this issue was the Inauguration of Theodore Roosevelt., William Henry Walker was born on February 13, 1871, in Pittston, Pennsylvania He entered Kentucky University in 1888, transferring to the University of Rochester where he received a Bachelor of Science in 1891. Walker started drawing cartoons for Life in 1894 and became a full-time staff member four years later. Walker’s style was a combination of serious politics and humor, which fit well into the image Life wanted to promote. He used stereotypical analogies to make his point, and concentrated on the increasing diversity of America and around domestic political policy. He died in 1938., Full page cover.]